Slowdown


Retrospect


After reading through the ritual of blessings and banishings, I feel that it is useful for us, but not absolutely necessary, nor is it necessary to do the four elements in that particular order.  The meditation, elemental cross ritual and divination are far more useful.

In peace,

N.

Water Symbolism


As I said yesterday, the symbolism of water is completely different in the Druid magical tradition than in others, however, none of Greer’s books that I have in my possession give any satisfactory discussion of elemental symbolism in other Western magical traditions which is highly annoying.  However, in the Druid tradition, water is the element of learning, growth and development.  It also has close ties to trees and other growing things.  There are a few other things, which I shall put in the Second Gate document.

In peace,

N.

Holding Pattern: Water and the Second Gate


Apparently, the symbolism for water is different for the Druid tradition than it is for others.  I don’t have access to some of my books right now, but I will have the info for you tomorrow night. Sorry about that. 

However, I will say this about invoking and banishing by the second gate:  the gate is West, not South.  Why is something I have yet to figure out, but that will have to wait for tomorrow.

In peace,

N.

Magical Theory: The Solar Plexus


Sorry for the lack of post yesterday, folks; food poisoning sucks.  The solar plexus is to etheric, i.e., magical energy, that the nose and mouth are to physical air:  you unconsciously ‘breathe’ in the energy through the solar plexus.  How is this useful in active magic, i.e., spell-casting? I’m not sure. This is a good subject for contemplative meditation.

In peace,

N.

The Middle Bit: Calling the Elements


Calling the Elements Cheat SheetIn between The Elemental Cross ritual and the Sphere of Light is the Calling of the Elements ritual. In the Calling of the Elements ritual, you are calling on seven (?!?), elements, and banishing the unbalanced aspects of four of them in your life:  the Classic Four (Earth, Air, Fire, and Water), plus Spirit Above, Spirit Within and Spirit Below.

Greer says that we shouldn’t mistake this invocation/banishing ritual as being one where we force either the elements or parts of ourselves to do anything.  He compares it to trying to make a river flow faster by pushing the water: a waste of effort.  What we are actually doing is aligning ourselves with a particular set of relationships which correspond to a particular element and use those relationships to re-define areas of our life.

We are supposed to spend at least two weeks practicing this part of the ritual until we have it down pat and can feel the air respond during the ritual.  During that time, we should pay attention to any symbols relating to air in other aspects of our lives, and note them down in our journals, which I hope you’re keeping.

In peace,

N.

Names: To Vibrate or not To Vibrate


When you say the names of a god or goddess in your invocation rituals, you can either say them normally or you can vibrate them, which is supposed to be more effective.  Greer says the best way to learn it is with a simple vowel tone.  Take a deep breath and chant the sound until you run out of breath.  As you make the sound, change the shape of your mouth and the quality of the tone until you feel a tingling sensation in your body somewhere.  It may be slight at first, but will get stronger with time and practice.  Eventually, you’ll be able to focus the vibration at various points of the body and even outside of the body as well.

Note: No matter how long your incantation is, you only vibrate the name; the rest said normally.

In peace,

N. 

Finally! Actual Meditation


So, after you do five minutes of breathing, then you focus on your meditation subject.

Now, you may be wondering why I’m going through all of this and the answer is simple:  we have to master the basics before we can expect to succeed with high-level magic.  Now, back to meditation.

To start, silently state your theme in as few words as possible or visualize it in an image, such as a rune, holding it in your mind for a short time, then start contemplating, exploring its implications and connections. Choose one that appeals to you, and follow it as far as you can.  Keep working at it for 10 minutes and then pay attention to your breathing to help return to ordinary awareness.

Your mind will probably wander in the beginning, and when it does, don’t beat yourself up and force your mind back to the theme, follow your thought pattern backwards, to where you left off and continue from there.  Meditate every day and you can add more actual meditation time gradually as you get better.

In peace,

N.

Breathing Stage: Rhythmic Breath


Like in just about every other meditation style on the planet, Greer’s meditation also uses the count-pause-count-pause style of breathing:  breathe in for three, pause for three, breathe out for three, pause for three.  He warns us not to close the throat when holding our breaths because it can lead to lung problems.

Like before, we’re supposed to practice only the relaxation and breathing parts until the breath rhythm becomes automatic and we can remain comfortable relaxed for five minutes of breathing.

In peace,

N.

Posture: Sit Up Straight!


So, instead of the common posture of sitting on a hard floor with crossed legs, Greer says we are to sit on a chair with a hard seat instead.  This doesn’t seal off our energies from the cosmos.  We have to sit so our lower back isn’t resting against the back of the chair with our feet flat against the floor.  The back should be straight without being stiff and our heads should be upright, no slumped shoulders, etc.  Our hands should be palm down on our thighs and our elbows at our sides.  We should look something similar to this badly drawn picture of an Egyptian statue.   

We need to meditate in the same place every day, facing East if we can, at roughly the same time every day or at least at the same point every day, such as before breakfast.  Greer says that outdoors is best, but indoors will do.  The last thing we need is to have a clock placed where we can check the time without turning our heads.  I guess I’ll be going shopping.

In peace,

N.

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